Fast Facts

Don’t Buy Them… Re-Grow Them!

As tiny sprouts of our springtime flowers emerge for another chance at life, we were reminded to look at our kitchen scraps with the same attitude of renewal. Many fruit and vegetable scraps that are deemed inedible or compost-worthy can be directly re-grown into food that is edible, tasty, and nutritious. And the cycle of growing new food from scraps can be repeated over and over again - allowing you to produce an unending supply of fruits and vegetables from food scraps that you ordinarily might have composted or thrown away.

What are the Benefits of Re-Growing Fruit and Vegetable Scraps?
There are dozens of reasons why re-growing food scraps is beneficial to both you and the environment. For example, regenerating fruit and vegetable scraps means less landfill waste, it supplements your food budget, and it also allows you to grow organic food that you know is healthy and nutritious. Additionally, spawning nourishing food from scraps is one of the most environmentally friendly methods of recycling and an excellent teaching activity to share with your kids.

What Will Grow?
There are dozens of fruits and vegetables that can be re-grown. Following is a list of some of the easiest:

  • Avocado
  • Beets
  • Bok Choy
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Garlic
  • Ginger
  • Green Onions
  • Herbs
  • Leeks
  • Lemon Grass
  • Mushrooms
  • Pineapple
  • Potatoes
  • Romaine Lettuce
  • Rutabagas
  • Scallions
  • Turnips

How to Get Started
Depending on the specific fruit and/or vegetable you are planning to revive, there are plenty of tips and tricks to help your plant reach its maximum potential. The following articles contain lots of information on how to give your fruit and vegetable scraps the proper jump start into their new life!

Don’t Forget To Compost The Rest!
Regenerating your unused fruit and vegetable scraps into plants that will ultimately produce a second or third generation of food is an exciting proposition. Besides being a quicker alternative to growing plants from seeds, the process is both simple and rewarding. Of course, there are always inedible rinds and skins headed from your cutting board to the compost or trash can and the quickest way to repurpose them is by pre-composting. Drop your absolutely unusable bits of fruits and vegetables into a Green Cycler or chop them into quarter-sized bits. Pre-composted organic material is perfect for directly amending to your garden or potting soil, or for feeding your worm bin.

This season, set your recycling goal high and add re-growing food scraps to your springtime activities.

Original article can be found on the Green Cycler website.

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